Apr 13, 2015 - ALBERTA POLICE BACK EFFORT FOR NEW LAW, STIFFER PENALTIES FOR KILLER DRUNK DRIVERS

 


A campaign to change Canada’s law dealing with drunk drivers who kill has a powerful new ally in Alberta.

The association that represents 4,500 Alberta municipal police officers has thrown its support behind the work of Families for Justice, an organization that wants to see the current law, impaired driving causing death, replaced by a law called “vehicular homicide.” A private member’s bill, C-652, has been introduced in parliament. The group also wants to see a mandatory minimum penalty of five years in prison imposed on drunks who kill.

Several Calgary families who have lost family members to killer drunks, including the family of victim Francis Pesa and the family of victim Bradley Arsenault, support the initiative, which was started by a British Columbia woman.

Markita Kaulius’s daughter Kassandra was 22 when she was killed by a drunk driver in May 2011. The female driver had a blood alcohol level twice the legal limit, ran a red light at more than 100 km/hr and plowed into Kassandra’s vehicle. The driver fled the scene but was caught later. She was sentenced to 37 months in penitentiary. She is now free from prison on statutory release.

Markita Kaulius created the group Families for Justice, to push for tougher treatment of killer drunk drivers. Currently, many drunks who kill are sentenced under the provisions of the criminal charge impaired driving causing death, which carries a maximum penalty of life in prison. Paul Wozney, a staff sergeant in Calgary Police service and president of the Alberta Federation of Police Associations, spoke to Dave Taylor and Angela Kokott on April 13, 2015, about the lobbying campaign.

Source: News Talk 770


 

Last updated on: 2015-04-27 | Link to this post