May 15, 2015 - HOW WE DRINK: HERE'S EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CANADIANS' OVERALL BOOZY HABITS - part three

PART ONE

PART TWO


 

A SHORT HISTORY OF BOOZE

1810s Forget coffee. Most labourers took a shot of whiskey at morning and afternoon breaks as a “stimulant” and incentive to keep them hard at work.

1820s-1830s Critics of drinking at work emerged as focus on commercial and industrial capitalism took hold. “The broad middle class became teetotallers and wanted everyone else to do that,” says Craig Heron, author of Booze: A Distilled History.

1840s A wave of revival campaigns tried to get people to sign on to alcohol prohibition in Canada.

1850s New Brunswick passed legislation banning alcohol, but it only lasted a few months because it was such a failure. It came close in what’s now Ontario and Nova Scotia.

1915-1917 All provinces except Quebec passed prohibition legislation. Meanwhile, First World War soldiers were given rum in the trenches to “keep them from going over the top,” Heron says.

1927 Ontario opened its first liquor stores, lagging behind other provinces such as Quebec and British Columbia which did so first. “The great experiment with prohibition was a huge failure,” Heron says. “There was a great deal of bootlegging and rum running.”
1934 The first public drinking places, called “beverage rooms” opened up. There were strict rules against merrymaking, Heron says, in order to maintain control. Men only.

1947 Sees the first taverns, where entertainment and food is allowed. Women are permitted, but in segregated rooms that men can only enter if in the company of a lady.

1985 Consumption of alcohol peaks in Canada, at roughly 9 litres of pure booze per person. Drunk driving legislative efforts have been ramping up.

1995 Alcohol consumption has lowered dramatically, thanks in part to the drunk driving awareness efforts and a newfound emphasis on health and wellness.
2015 Twenty years after alcohol consumption levels dipped, they’ve climbed right back up again — not quite to 1980s levels, but close.

 

Source: National Post


 

Last updated on: 2015-06-01 | Link to this post